Write-in Candidates Winners In The Past

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TIME TO MAKE HISTORY AND CHANGE THE FUTURE!

Pray, everybody please! There is a great chance if America can gain the favor of our Creator! It’s time to show them how it’s done and get the votes in for the ONLY SAFE CANDIDATES:

DARRELL CASTLE/ SCOTT BRADLEY

THE HISTORY OF SUCCESS FOR WRITE IN CANDIDATES:

Presidential Primaries:

In 1928, Herbert Hoover won the Republican Massachusetts presidential primary on write-ins, polling 100,279.

In 1940, Franklin D. Roosevelt won the Democratic New Jersey presidential primary with 34,278 write-ins.

In 1944, Thomas Dewey won the Republican Pennsylvania presidential primary with 146,706 write-ins.

In 1948, Harold Stassen won the Republican Pennsylvania presidential primary with 81,242 write-ins.

In 1952, Robert A. Taft won the Republican Nebraska presidential primary with 79,357 write-ins.

In 1952, Estes Kefauver won the Democratic Pennsylvania presidential primary with 93,160 write-ins.

In 1952, Dwight Eisenhower won the Republican Massachusetts presidential primary with 254,898 write-ins.

In 1956, Dwight Eisenhower won the Republican Massachusetts presidential primary with 51,951 write-ins.

In 1960, Richard Nixon won the Republican Massachusetts presidential primary with 53,164 write-ins.

Also in 1960, John F. Kennedy won the Democratic Pennsylvania presidential primary with 183,073 write-ins, and he won the Democratic Massachusetts presidential primary with 91,607 write-ins.

In 1964, a write-in campaign organized by supporters of former U.S. Senator and vice presidential nominee Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. won Republican primaries for President in New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Massachusetts, defeating declared candidates Barry Goldwater, Nelson Rockefeller, and Margaret Chase Smith.

In 1968 in the Democratic presidential primary in New Hampshire, incumbent President Lyndon Johnson did not file, but received write-ins totaling 50% of all Democratic votes cast. Senator Eugene McCarthy, who campaigned actively against Johnson’s Vietnam war policies, was on the ballot. He received an impressive 41% of the vote and gained more delegates than the President. Johnson was so stunned that he did not run for reelection.

In 1992, consumer advocate Ralph Nader ran a write-in campaign during the New Hampshire primary for the presidential nomination of both the Democratic and Republican parties. Declaring himself the “none of the above candidate” and using his Concord Principles as his platform, Nader received 3,054 votes from Democrats and 3,258 votes from Republicans.

Senate:

Republican William Knowland was elected in 1946 to the U.S. Senate from California.

Democrat Strom Thurmond was elected in 1954 to the United States Senate in South Carolina as a write-in candidate, after state Democratic leaders had blocked him from receiving the party’s nomination.

***In 2010 incumbent Alaska Senator Lisa Murkowski lost the Republican primary to Joe Miller. Following her defeat she ran in the general election as a write-in candidate. Murkowski had filed, and won, a lawsuit requiring election officials to have the list of names of write-in candidates distributed at the polls and subsequently won the election with a wide enough margin over both Miller, and Democratic Party candidate Scott T. McAdams, to make moot the write-in ballots that had been challenged by Miller.

House of Representatives:

In 1918, Peter F. Tague was elected to the U.S. House as a write-in independent Democrat, defeating the Democratic nominee, John F. Fitzgerald.

In 1930 Republican Charles F. Curry, Jr. was elected to the House as a write-in from Sacramento, California.

Democrat Charlie Wilson was the endorsed candidate of the Democratic Party for Ohio’s 6th congressional district in Ohio to replace Ted Strickland in 2006.

Democrat Dave Loebsack entered the 2006 Democratic primary in Iowa’s second congressional district as a write-in candidate after failing to get the required number of signatures. He won the primary and in the general election.

State legislatures:

Several members of the Alaska House of Representatives were elected as write-in candidates during the 1960s and 1970s, particularly from rural districts in the northern and western portions of the state.Examples of successful write-in candidates include Kenneth A. Garrison and Father Segundo Llorente (1960), Frank R. Ferguson (1972), James H. “Jimmy” Huntington (1974), Nels A. Anderson, Jr. (1976), Axel C. Johnson, (ran for re-election as a write-in candidate after failing to formally file his candidacy paperwork), Johnson and Llorente, etc…

Carl Hawkinson of Galesburg, Illinois won the Republican primary for the Illinois Senate from Illinois’s 47th District in 1986 as a write-in candidate. He went on to be elected in the general election and served until 2003.

In 1990, Conservative New York State Senator Serphin Maltese won the party’s nomination as a write-in candidate.

Charlotte Burks won as a Democratic write-in candidate for the Tennessee Senate seat left vacant when the incumbent, her husband Tommy, was assassinated by his opponent, Byron Looper, two weeks before the elections of November 2, 1998. The assassin was the only name on the ballot, so Charlotte ran as a write-in candidate.

Winnie Brinks was elected to the Michigan House of Representatives in 2012 after a series of unusual events. Brinks ran as a write-in to be the Democratic nominee. She won the primary and was listed on the ballot in the general election, which she also won.

Scott Wagner was elected as an anti-establishment Republican write-in candidate to the Pennsylvania Senate in a March 2014.

Local government:

Julia Allen of Readington, New Jersey won a write-in campaign in the November 2005 elections for the Township Committee.

Mike Duggan filed petition to run for mayor of Detroit in 2013; however, following a court challenge, Duggan’s name was removed from the ballot. Duggan then campaigned as a write-in in the August 2013 primary, with the intent of being one of the top two vote-getters and thus advancing to the general election in November. Duggan received the highest number of votes in the primary, and advanced to the runoff in November. He eventually defeated challenger Sheriff Benny Napoleon and became the Mayor of Detroit.

Michael Jarjura was re-elected Mayor of Waterbury, Connecticut in 2005 as a write-in candidate after losing the Democratic party primary to Karen Mulcahy.

James Maher won the mayorship of Baxter Estates, New York on March 15, 2005 as a write-in candidate.

Beverly O’Neil won a third term as Mayor of Long Beach, California as a write-in candidate in 2002.

Michael Sessions, an 18-year-old high school senior, won as a write-in candidate for Mayor of Hillsdale, Michigan in 2005. He was too young to qualify for the ballot.

Anthony A. Williams, then incumbent Mayor of Washington, D.C. was forced to run as a write-in candidate in the 2002 Democratic primary, because he had too many invalid signatures for his petition. He won the Democratic primary, and went on to win re-election.

In the November 8, 2011, election for Commonwealth’s Attorney of Richmond County, Virginia, 16-year incumbent Wayne Emery has been certified the winner as a write-in candidate over challenger James Monroe by a margin of 53 votes (2.4%) out of 2,230 votes cast.

Others-

Aaron Schock was elected to the District 150 School Board in Peoria, Illinois in 2001 by a write-in vote. He defeated the incumbent by over 2,000 votes, approximately 6,400 to 4,300 votes.

John Adams became an Orange County, California judge in November 2002 after running along with 10 other write-in candidates in the primaries on March 5, 2002 against incumbent Judge Ronald Kline.

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